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Photos courtesy of Dr. Sue McDonnell. In a perfect world, a stallion walks into the breeding shed, drops, stands calmly for preparation, travels politely over to the mare, and while he might vocalize with excitement, he still takes care of business in an organized, safe manner — either on the mounting dummy or with the mare — then dismounts and follows his handler back to his stall. But what do you do when your stallion acts like a ruffian — striking, biting and exhibiting other problematic behavior?

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How can you encourage a more amenable demeanor? Not surprisingly, a calm handler is key to keeping a stallion calm and well-mannered in the breeding barn. The scenario: At any point during the interaction with a stallion, he reaches around and nips or bites the handler. Why he does it: Dr. McDonnell says. How to handle it: Dr. Practical tips: The handler should gear up with whatever it takes to keep calm — a heavy jacket to protect arms and shoulders, for example.

McDonnell recommends trying a soft grazing muzzle on the stallion during these interactions. Another strategy is changing up the restraint.

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If the chain is looped around the nose, for example, Dr. McDonnell says try threading it through the mouth gently, like a bit, with loose tension, to give the horse something to use his tongue to play with rather than nipping. Horses are individuals in what works best, but it is worth trying different halter and lead arrangements. Why he does it: During the teasing phase, the stallion might bite at the mare for a few reasons: It can be frustration with the restraint on the stallion or the mare might not be at liberty to respond that she is ready with the appropriate als to the stallion.

For a stallion with an extreme problem with biting the mare during teasing, Dr. Then you just have to get them to the mare safely. The scenario: During the time leading up to actually mounting the mare, a stallion might strike out at the mare with a foreleg. This behavior, thought natural, can be dangerous for a couple of reasons. If the handler is in the way, injuries could occur. If the stallion is positioned close to the breeding stocks or some other stationary object, he could hit his leg, or push the handler into it.

How to handle it: If your stallion tends to do this, Dr. McDonnell recommends keeping him away from the head of the mare. Although the face-to-face meeting is typically the first encounter at liberty, she says most stallions can respond for breeding without that interaction. And give the horse plenty of room away from stationary objects, should he try to strike. The scenario: Some stallions kick out in response to having their penises cleaned prior to either breeding a mare or semen collection.

McDonnell says this response most frequently occurs with inexperienced stallions naturally unused to the sensations of the cleaning process. How to handle it: For a novice stallion, Dr. Practical tips: Dr. McDonnell advises handlers to wear a helmet, a safety vest and safety shoes for this work, and particularly for a horse that has a tendency to kick.

The tendency may be to rush, and with that often, without even realizing it, we accidentally make it more uncomfortable for the horse. The scenario: As the handler is leading the stallion toward the mare or breeding shed, the horse rears. The horse goes up in the air, you jerk on him, he comes down, and the pressure on the chain pops him right back up.

After two or three replicates of that, many stallions appear to figure out that rearing gets them going in the wrong direction. If rearing frees him from the handler so he can get to the mare or the dummy mount, the handler is inadvertently reinforcing that behavior. The scenario: During the breeding process, a stallion might mount the mare or dummy too soon or too vigorously — whether before everything is in place or before the mare is in position or simply just too forcefully.

Why he does it: If rushing has led to breeding before, Dr. How to handle it: Reduce the stimulation. For example, for semen collection, try without using a live stimulus mare. Or prepare the stallion outside of the breeding area. Similarly, sometimes blinkers or blinders can subdue a rushing stallion so he can learn he does not have to rush.

Sue McDonnell says ground collection might be a better option. The scenario: As the handler is leading the stallion toward the mare or breeding shed, the stallion barges ahead and pushes past the handler. Why he does it: This is usually because the stallion is anticipating getting to the mare.

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How to handle it: Work with the horse away from breeding conditions to teach him basic ground commands of forward, stop and back. As you approach the mare, as long as he stays with you, even if prancing and vocalizing, keep progressing. If he starts to get ahead of you, calmly turn and walk him in the opposite direction. Practical tips: Some handlers will carry a small stick, to keep something rigid between them and the stallion.

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McDonnell says that for horses and handlers, this stick can be a physical reminder for the horse to keep space between himself and the handler. Again, care should be taken not to use this as a weapon of punishment. And the goal is to use this as a temporary training aid with the expectation that once the horse learns, it will no longer be needed.

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Why he does it: Under natural conditions, this is a common behavior, a threat gesture, says Dr. If the stallion mounts the mare or dummy but is not able to ejaculate for some reason, he might try the same reflexive threat gesture toward the dummy mount. It will surprise many handlers how valuable this simple skill can be in the breeding situation. Physically disciplining your horse is the one thing that Dr. Establishing a trusting relationship is more effective, safer and more efficient, Dr.

Be soft and nonconfrontational. Sue McDonnell is an adjunct professor of reproductive behavior at the New Bolton Center at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, where she is the founding head of the university's equine behavior program.

And she is the author of two introductory books on horse behavior: "Understanding Horse Behavior" and "Understanding Your Horse's Behavior. How to Handle 8 Stallion Behavior Problems. Home how to handle 8 stallion behavior problems. How to Handle 8 Stallion Behavior Problems Learn how to handle eight troublesome behaviors and teach your breeding stallion manner with tips from Dr. By Abigail Boatwright In a perfect world, a stallion walks into the breeding shed, drops, stands calmly for preparation, travels politely over to the mare, and while he might vocalize with excitement, he still takes care of business in an organized, safe manner — either on the mounting dummy or with the mare — then dismounts and follows his handler back to his stall.

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Use these tips to manage his behaviors without stifling his libido. Nipping and Biting the Handler The scenario: At any point during the interaction with a stallion, he reaches around and nips or bites the handler.

Striking The scenario: During the time leading up to actually mounting the mare, a stallion might strike out at the mare with a foreleg. Kicking During Prep The scenario: Some stallions kick out in response to having their penises cleaned prior to either breeding a mare or semen collection. Rearing The scenario: As the handler is leading the stallion toward the mare or breeding shed, the horse rears. How to handle it: Avoid trying to tug the horse down with the lead. Rushing Ahead The scenario: During the breeding process, a stallion might mount the mare or dummy too soon or too vigorously — whether before everything is in place or before the mare is in position or simply just too forcefully.

Sue McDonnell Dr. Sep 22, Cumulative or consecutive breederBreeding. Oct 01, TrainingShowingShowing. Reining Circle Tips from Matt Mills. Dec 12, Breeding and foal careBreedingHorse Ownership. Feb 21, BreedingHorse Ownership. Horse Color Myths and Anecdotes. Jul 17, Breeding and foal careBreedingWorking cow horse. Breeding for Structural Correctness. Back to top.

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How to Handle 8 Stallion Behavior Problems